Volume 7, Issue 3, May 2019, Page: 72-76
The Philosophicum – Model Project of Philosophy of Medicine in Medical Education and Practice in Germany Perspective Article
Jonas Daub, Department of Medicine: Philosophicum, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany
Hans Christoph Aster, Department of Neurology, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany
Hannah Gauger, Department of Medicine: Philosophicum, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany
Till Gallasch, Department of Medicine: Philosophicum, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany
Michael Schmidt, Ethics Comitee, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany
Johann Heinrich Koenigshausen, Institute of Philosophy, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany
Thomas Bohrer, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Kulmbach Gerneral Hospital, Kulmbach, Germany
Received: Mar. 3, 2019;       Accepted: Apr. 10, 2019;       Published: Jun. 29, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajim.20190703.14      View  62      Downloads  13
Abstract
Medical and philosophical thinking belong together, cannot be separated neither in scientific theory nor in practice, and only the symbiosis of both can face the challange to reflect the basic phenomenon of both of these desiciplines: human life itself. No patient expects to be treated exclusively on the basis of the latest scientific results, but also wants to be perceived by his doctor as an unique individual. It is the doctor’s specific task to embed the scientifically developed diagnoses therapeutically into each individual patient’s biography. Furthermore such a perspecitve increases patient safety and it enables a future of trust in the doctor-patient relationship. The „Philosophicum“ is a model project in Germany that brings together philosophers, physicians and students to do research and education in the broad and enriching intersection of medicine and philosophy. Based on many years of experience, we are convinced that a structured philosophical education can substantially improve medical studies and subsequently doctors‘ work. Medical anthropology and hermeneutics are necessary and also teachable. The preparation should start early in the medical education and should be strengthened by bedside training while interacting with the patient. This requires philosophically interested and trained doctors and students. Exactely for that reason we favor integrating a philosophicum into the medical eduacation and practice.
Keywords
Philosophy and Medicine, Medical Ethics, Medical Education and Training, Theory of Medicine, Philosophy of Medicine as a Humanitarian Practice
To cite this article
Jonas Daub, Hans Christoph Aster, Hannah Gauger, Till Gallasch, Michael Schmidt, Johann Heinrich Koenigshausen, Thomas Bohrer, The Philosophicum – Model Project of Philosophy of Medicine in Medical Education and Practice in Germany Perspective Article, American Journal of Internal Medicine. Vol. 7, No. 3, 2019, pp. 72-76. doi: 10.11648/j.ajim.20190703.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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